CAT Tracks for September 29, 2012
CARR V. KOCH...THE MOVIE

It's me, it's me...

...on court TV!

Really...

...although I'll have to get a witness!


For a brief "shiny" moment (at the bottom of the screen, slightly right of center)...

...until the astute director in charge of the two fixed courtroom cameras (apparently blinded by the light) switched views so as to not allow my heady "moment in the sun" to distract from the proceedings (or possibly so that the camera would be trained on the faces of the attorneys presenting the oral arguments.)

After my dazzling appearance in the opening scene, I was relegated to a lesser (albeit steady roll) which may lead to the theatrical release being entitled "My Left Hand". (I am the arm/shoulder on the left edge of the screen attired in black rather than gray.)

If only I had known...

...I could have leaned over some, I could have dropped something in the aisle and bent over to retrieve it.


Maybe I'll luck out...

...maybe the Illinois Supreme Court will do as the United States Supreme Court did in one of my favorite Government/U.S. History movies: Separate But Equal (about the landmark case of Brown v. Board of Education - starring Sidney Poitier as Thurgood Marshall, with Burt Lancaster appearing for the defense.)

In the movie, Poitier (as Thurgood) "messed up" in his initial appearance before the United States Supreme Court and was at home, despondently awaiting news about what he knew would be an adverse decision against the plaintiffs due to his botched oral argument. To his delight, when the phone rings, it is good news...that the United States Supreme Court Justices were unable to reach a decision after "Round 1" and had chosen to call the lawyers back to re-argue their positions.

Next time, I'll sit on the other side of the courtroom...behind the podium.

Makeup!


Okay...

...I'm done.

You know me, I can't resist the catty commentary...


This is a truly serious case...

...as it could result in how the State of Illinois funds it public education system, a multi-billion-dollar-a-year operation. It could impact the amount of property taxes that homeowners are required to provide for public schools in Illinois. As the attorney for Carr et al points out, should the court rule in favor of the plaintiff, the matter of state funding for public education will be remanded back to the Illinois General Assembly for reconsideration.


But...

...enough with the preview of coming attractions!

Got your popcorn and soda ready?

On with the show...


From the Illinois Supreme Court website...

School Funding | Carr v. Koch (36 min.) | 9/18/12 (Video)